Boathammer : Age of Bloggening

July 3, 2008

Five Things That Worry Me or Encourage Me About Warhammer

Filed under: Enumeration — boatorious @ 1:31 am

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There have been a number of these lists floating around. You’ll notice I spend a lot of time comparing WAR to WoW. In my mind there’s really no other game in town.

Five Things That Worry Me About Warhammer

  1. The NDA is Still Up
    With less than three months to the projected launch date the NDA is still up. Although that kind of secrecy isn’t unprecedented, WoW had dropped its NDA around seven months before the game was released.

    Especially considering that you can easily close off “unfinished” portions of the game — what isn’t the general public ready to see?

    One thought is that, while the NDA will allegedly still be active during the guild beta, it might be smoke and mirrors since Mythic may be waiting until the Guild Beta starts to announce the drop.

  2. There are still CE’s available
    Mythic has made it clear that there are only 60,000 CE’s available. The CE should be attractive to players because it offers a head start and guaranteed access to the beta.

    However, there are evidently still a number of CE’s still available. Considering the recent success of Age of Conan, selling 60,000 beta keys shouldn’t be that hard.

  3. Bastion Stair
    Mythic recently released a video of one of the end game dungeons, the Bastion Stair.

    What can I say about it? Well, the exterior looks great. The inside … well, the inside has an awful lot of red hallways with blue columns connecting small red rooms.

    A raider is going to spend a lot of time in a twenty-five man dungeon and it helps if the dungeon reminds you of how great the game looks instead of how you’re sick of looking at the same wall texture for 20 hours a week. If I were Mythic I would hold off on the Stair at release.

  4. Variety of Gameplay
    Most MMORPGs have PvE as the main game and PvP as the sideshow. That’s OK, because there’s generally a lot of solo PvE to jump into, and since PvP is always easy to jump into there are always two options for players who can’t find a group.

    Warhammer inverts the equation. Crafting seems a little sparse, and there doesn’t seem like there is much solo PvE at max, via repeatable quests or honor or what have you. So what do you do in Warhammer when you’re bored of PvP?

  5. The Wife Doesn’t Think She’s Going To Play
    I realize this doesn’t affect most of you, but the single most important factor in my MMO adoption has always been my wife’s tastes. When I start a game and she doesn’t pick it up, I tend to quit. I also tend to quit if she quits.

    It’s really for a number of reasons. It’s nice to chat with her in game, and I’m not trying to schedule my game playing around hanging out with her (since it’s fun to play together). Really , a game doesn’t seem massively multiplayer to me unless I’m playing with my wife.

Five Things That Encourage Me About Warhammer

  1. What we’ve seen so far looks good
    With the exception of Bastion Stair I haven’t seen any feature of the game that seems poorly designed or just un-fun. Indeed, there are a lot of nice things in the game, like the dynamic landscape (capturing, leveling cities), and the Tome of Knowledge. Not to mention that the Warhammer IP is just rich, fun, and … old.
  2. The devs seem to say the right things
    The interviews with Jeff Hickman and Paul Barnett seem to go well. They talk a good game and talk like they know what a good game is. They seem spontaneous but never seem to throw any red flags.

    Of course I never really understand what Paul Barnett is saying. Who knew Canadians could be so silly?

  3. It’s the Age of the MMO
    Many people worry about the effect of WoW on WAR, but not me. Nearly everybody who plays WoW needs a break sooner or later. What do you play during your break? How about something a lot like WoW but with some cool, different features?

    I played one MMORPG that I took seriously before WoW. During breaks from WoW I’ve now tried out four or five.

    In an age where lackluster MMORPG’s survive and flourish, an even half-decent Warhammer has little to fear.

  4. How successful does it have to be?
    We often talk about WoW’s 10 million players but not much about how relatively small other MMOG’s have been. It took EVE online two or three years just to hit 100,000 users. And how long have they been around? 100,000 users paying 15 bucks a month gives you almost 20 million dollars a year. When you’re paying a lot of technical people that’s not an infinite number of money, but it does let you staff more than enough to keep your game going.

    If Warhammer manages 100,000 players in North America and 100,000 players in Europe, subscription fees alone will get them about 35 million a year, which should be more than enough to keep the devs, EA, and the fans fat and happy.

  5. They’ve done this all before
    The game doesn’t seem to have the polish of WoW, but I’m also fairly confident that we’ll never see a WoW-original-honor-system level catastrophe from Mythic. They have run a successful MMO in the past and hopefully have all their big design mistakes behind them.
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